Busy is not a Badge

I just finished hosting #satchatwc with my awesome co-moderator, Beth Houf.  The chat today focused on strategies to help us prioritize our time. This tweet exchange with Robert Abney and Sandy King stuck with me…

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As educators, the reality is our work is never done. There is no finish line. We add more to the “to do” list than we cross off.

We will always have more on our plates than we can tackle each day, so the real challenge is this:

How do we take control of our time?

 

Great leaders master this. They spend the majority of their time doing the work that matters most. They create systems to get the essential components of the “job” done and free up their time to do the meaningful “work”.

Like all leaders, great leaders are busy all day long, but at the end of the day…

Busy is not their badge… Making an IMPACT is!

 

2 thoughts on “Busy is not a Badge

  1. While I agree with the outline of this idea, I think consideration is due when our timetable is not our own.

    For many teachers, they’re literally given 45min outside of instruction time to collaborate, plan, provide feedback, etc. We know that doesn’t provide time to spend energy on what’s effective for instruction. Let alone prioritize emails or other on-going tasks.

    I think a better starting is to begin the hard conversation of what really impacts learning. What should go on the plate? …rather than here’s how to arrange what’s on the plate.

    The outcome of that conversation may lead us to deeply alter the way in which we do school. But it might be for the better – if we’re serious about impacting instruction.

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