Shelley Burgess

Reflections of an educational learner and leader

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The Innovator’s Mindset – Worldwide MOOC

Dave and I would like to personally invite you to participate in what will surely be an incredible book study starting on September 17th.3d-im

In less than one year since the release,  The Innovator’s Mindset by George Couros has been a complete game changer in education. This book has sparked powerful conversations, prodded people and systems out of complacency, and driven real change in ways that are truly astounding. It is already being used as a text in multiple university education departments and book studies have been conducted literally worldwide. Over 200 people have given it a 5 Star review on Amazon and thousands of books have been sold each month. The positive response to George’s work has been overwhelming. To say that we are proud to be his publisher is an understatement.

But not one to be content with this success, George is creating an opportunity that is truly NEXT LEVEL.

Starting on September 17th, The Innovator’s Mindset MOOC is kicking off an experience that will be unlike anything ever offered in the way of a book study. It is specially designed to not just study the book, but to move way beyond that into implementation and true innovation.

MOOC stands for Massive Open Online Course and that is exactly what this will be.

Massive: Well over 1,000 educators will be participating by the time this is ready to start.

Open: Anybody can join. Just get the book and use any or all of the various methods to participate. In fact, there are already educators from OVER 18 countries signed up!

Online: There is a Twitter component using the hashtag #IMMOOC, there is a Facebook Group, a blog site, and there will even be YouTube Live interviews with influential educators. Can’t make it at the time of the live video? No problem…all of them will be archived and shared!

Course: This so much MORE than a book study. It is truly a fully developed six week course put together by George and the amazing, innovative educator, Katie Martin (@KatieMTLC). Every participant is also encouraged to share their learning using blogs and/or video and to develop an innovation project. (Want to follow the writings of fellow participants? Here is how.) This is not about surface level platitudes…this about diving in DEEP and making a true impact!!!

Please share this opportunity with everyone you know and prod, push, and cajole educators in your system to join you! This could be exactly what your leadership group needs to change the conversation and truly shift the paradigm to one of true innovation. As George says in The Innovator’s Mindset, “Change is the opportunity to do something cw34er7wqaeo1zt-jpg-largeamazing.” Don’t let this opportunity pass you by!

Read all details on the blog right HERE or go STRAIGHT TO THE SIGN UP PAGE HERE!




Why Every Parent (and Educator) Should Play Pokemon Go

IMG_2086Over the past two weeks, Pokemon Go has taken the world by storm.  Over 25 million people have downloaded the app and are out in our neighborhoods.  Players are EVERYWHERE hunting for Pokemon, setting lures to draw them in, battling for gyms and recuperating needed supplies at PokeStops. By now even if you aren’t playing, you know the rest of us when you see us… we are walking around everywhere looking up and down at our phones and stopping once in awhile to flick our fingers across our screens.  We congregate  in certain areas because we have heard they are hot spots for catching rare Pokemon, and you see our fists pump accompanied by our enthusiastic “YES!” when we catch something new.

I admit it… I am a highly educated 45 year old woman, and I am a Pokemon Go addict, and glad I am.  I know I’m not alone… I’ve mingled with some of my peers recently who also make those sideways glances at their phones to see if a Pokemon has crossed their path! This weekend at my son’s lacrosse tournament, I actually chose where to sit and watch the games because it was situated right in between two PokeStops! I went from level 14 to level 16 over the course of the weekend!

My husband Dave and I downloaded the app on the second day of its release, and I haven’t looked back (unless of course, I need to look back to capture a Pikachu). So now that I have been playing for two weeks and have reached Level 17, here are the three things I’m loving most about playing Pokemon Go (and I think you will too)

Learning together:  Both my children (I have a 12 year old daughter and a fifteen year old son) and ALL of their friends are playing, and I can guarantee you all of your students are playing too.  What has been so awesome as a parent, is that my children and I have been learning the language and the rules of the game together.  I have constantly been engaged in conversation after conversation with my kids and their friends about the game.  They are teaching me stuff, and I am teaching them.  We are comparing our Pokemon, teaching each other new tricks and strategies and collectively we are getting better. From them I have learned things like how to delete items to get more storage space, the “pidgey  hack”, and the best times to use my lucky eggs… they have made me better!  Putting myself in the role of a learner with my kids is a wonderful place to be.

Connecting and Collaborating:  What an awesome opportunity this has been to connect and collaborate with my own children and their friends.  While it is often the case that when I drive a group of teens around town, I’m simply background noise if I talk to them.  Now I’m an engaged partner in the conversations.  They want to know which Pokemon I have caught and what their CP levels are… they want to show me their phones and celebrate their latest catch. We share genuine excitement when we come across a rare Pokemon, take over a gym, or hatch an egg, and we commiserate with each other when our screens freeze or the game won’t load.  We have also had serious discussions about how we think the game could improve.  (Niantic… If you are reading this, we unanimously agree that their need to be additional ways to earn stardust, and we also strongly believe that when you transfer higher CP Pokemon or evolved Pokemon, you should get more candy!)  What a treat these types of conversations are for those of us who parent (or educate) kids at this age.

Getting outside and exploring our neighborhood:  Because we are all on a quest for Pokemon, my children have been willing to go anywhere with me.  In the past two weeks we have been to Balboa Park, the Coronado ferry landing, the Oceanside pier, Chicano Park and many other places we wouldn’t have been this summer, some of which we have never even been to before.  I even think I will be able to convince my kids to go to the zoo with me next week. We have walked and hiked and sometimes just sat together for thirty minutes chatting while we drop a lure and wait to see what comes our way.   The game is getting us outside allowing us to explore new places and revisit old stomping grounds.  We have shared memories of times we have been there before, and we are creating new ones now.  The game is causing us to ask each other, where do we want to go next?

I have heard many adults over the past few weeks complain about the game and the “damage” it is doing to our kids and our society, and I wholeheartedly disagree.  It has been a wonderful opportunity for me to be a part of something that matters to my kids, and we are having a blast playing together.  If you are a parent or a teacher and haven’t given it a shot, try it out… I think you’ll be glad you did!

Happy hunting!





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#LeadLAP Challenge – Teacher Appreciation Week: Personalize It!

So… I’ll admit that this challenge maybe should have been sent out a few weeks ago as Teacher Appreciation Week is now upon us, but we still felt like it was worth posting even though it’s late in the game.  I don’t know about you, but as a principal I always looked forward to Teacher Appreciation Week.  I loved putting time, energy, and creative thought into how to honor the challenging and important work that teachers do day in and day out.  For me it was always the ultimate time to celebrate teachers, and Beth and I both believe in doing this in a very authentic and personal way.  We will admit that we have both had colleagues who do not look forward to this week… They treat it like one more thing to check off the “to do” list.  Their celebration of teachers this week is usually very general and looks something like picking a gift from a catalog and telling their secretary to order one for everyone, creating a generic note to attach to it and either putting it in the teacher mailboxes or handing it out at a staff meeting with a very general speech that sounds something like this: “You are all my heroes!  Each and every one of you makes a difference in the lives of our students, and I’m grateful for the work you all do.”  Sometimes the speech and the gift are accompanied by a lunch or some treats brought in by the PTA or catered by a local restaurant chosen by the secretary. Teacher appreciation… Check!  While celebrating teacher appreciation week in a general way can be a powerful component of what you do… adding a personalized touch can take it to the next level.

That’s what Beth and I like to do! Rather than just generalize teacher appreciation this week, we strive to personalize it and make it meaningful for each individual teacher in some way.  We also like to do things where we personally give of our time rather than asking others to give theirs. It takes more time and effort, but it is time well spent if by the end of the week each teacher knows that there is something unique and special about them that you appreciate and that you are willing to put in the time to honor their unique talents and gifts.  Including just one thing throughout the week that is personalized shows teachers that you care, that you notice what makes them different and special, and contributes to building that positive culture on your campus.  We ask our teachers to personalize for our students, Teacher Appreciation Week is a great way to do the same for our staff.

So… our #LeadLAP Challenge to you this week is to build in just one thing that is personalized for each teacher or is personally giving of your time.  Below are a few examples of things that Beth and I have done over the years.  We would love for you to share what you are doing to personalize teacher appreciation all week using the #LeadLAP hashtag.

Teacher Appreciation Gift Ideas:

  • Choose a book that you want to give to everyone, but make it personal in some way.  Beth gave her entire staff a copy of P is for PIRATE: Inspirational ABC’s for Educators and chose a letter that represented each individual teacher well.  She wrote a personal, hand-written note, inserted on the particular page explaining why that particular letter reminded her of them.  Below are a few pics:
  • Create an individualized poster for each teacher to hang in their classrooms.  Select a different quote or poem for each teacher and write a personal note as to why that quote/poem reminded you of them. If you have a special staff meeting or lunch, it’s fun to have these hanging up to decorate the room.  Teachers can do a gallery walk and see them and then take theirs down at the end of the event.
  • Take an hour one day this week and visit every single classroom. Tell their students that it is Teacher Appreciation Week and share a few words with the class about why you think their teacher is special.
  • Write a personalized letter to each teacher’s spouse, parent, or other significant person in their life telling them how much you appreciate them and why.  I had a teacher do this for me once… he wrote a letter to my mom thanking her for all she had done to contribute to the person I had become and they type of leader I was for our school.  It was one of the best gifts I (and my mom) ever received.
  • Give the gift of time.  One of the things I did every year was have a raffle during our teacher appreciation lunch.  The prizes were administrators giving their time in order to give a teacher the gift of time.  Prizes were things like covering recess or morning duty, covering a class period with the grand prize being a teacher day off… The teacher would get a day off, and I would teach their class for the day.

These are just a few simple examples.  We know you have more!!  We can’t wait to hear what you are doing to celebrate your teachers this week.  We look forward to seeing your pictures and Tweets in the #LeadLAP hashtag!



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#LeadLAP Challenge – 5 Survey

Beth and I are thrilled to have an amazing educational leader and friend, Amy Illingworth (@AmyLIllingworth) host this week’s #LeadLAP Challenge.  I will be writing a blog this week in response to the “5 survey” and sharing it in our #LeadLAP hashtag.  I hope you’ll join us!

From Amy:

Over the last few months the #LeadLAP challenges have asked us to get into classrooms to appreciate the amazing work our teachers are doing every day on behalf of their students.  We’ve dropped anchors, been enthusiastic, rethought professional learning, and harnessed the power of social media.  

reflectionToday it’s time to reflect and share our reflections with other leaders, to enhance our collective knowledge and impact on students and teachers.  Below is a survey asking you to reflect on your work as a #LeadLAP leader.  For each topic, brainstorm 5 items that relate to education, leadership and learning and why they ended up on your list.  Feel free to share your ideas on Twitter in the #LeadLAP hashtag or on your own blog.  We can learn from one another!

For a sample, see mine here.



Five Places I’m Dying To Visit

Five Tasks I Do Every Day

Five Talents I Wish I Had

Five Leaders I Wish I Could Work With

Five Twitter Hashtags I Love

Five Blogs I Love To Read

Five Phrases I Have On Repeat

Five Books On My To-Be-Read List


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#LeadLAP Challenge: Rethinking Professional Learning

This week Beth and I are thrilled to have our first “guest challenge” written by an amazing principal, Mandy Ellis @mandyeellis.  We hope you will join us and share your journey on Twitter using the #LeadLAP hashtag!

From Mandy:

Last week’s # LeadLAP challenge was focused on transformation of your traditional Face-to-Face professional learning opportunities. Creating meaningful learning experiences for our staff models best practices of engagement and the true “PIRATE Principles” for our teachers to apply in their classrooms. To continue to grow a culture of professional learning, we need to ensure professional learning is differentiated, relevant and meaningful to all staff. Fortunately for us, twitter is the perfect platform for promoting learning and networking amongst our staff.

At our fingertips, we have a network of professionals and innovative thinkers that are like-minded in their efforts to foster engagement and creative practices in their classroom, but differentiated in their thinking and approaches. This combination provides an opportunity to stretch thinking and inspire innovation for all teachers. You can read how the ripple effect has spread at one school here:

The Ripple Effect: Thinking of Professional Learning Differently

The positive impacts of twitter use in professional learning are powerful:

  • It can create a culture of positive personal professional learning in which teachers access twitter and/or blogs to seek to connect and learn with other educators and professionals. Teachers share their ideas with each other as well as staff in other buildings in our district and districts across the nation.
  • Teachers connect with parents, promote a positive culture, and reflect on their instructional practices. It has taken away the concept that we work in isolation and fostered open and collaborative learning amongst the staff.
  • It can provide an an outlet to provide feedback and be present in the classroom during times administrators can’t physically be there. As an instructional leader and coach, I have gained a stronger understanding and insight into classroom instruction by following the hashtags of the twitter challenges teachers are participating in.
  • In some cases, it has created a ripple effect in which parents have created twitter accounts to follow classroom learning.

For this week’s #LeadLAP challenge consider how you could harness the power of social media, specifically twitter, to promote ongoing and individualized professional learning among your staff. Create a twitter challenge that focuses on a school goal or professional learning need. You can create a month long challenge, a week long, or one for use during your next staff meeting or school improvement day! Make sure you develop a school hashtag and participate in the challenge yourself. Some examples are below:


An added element to the challenge is to consider how you can promote the challenge and motivate your staff to participate. Maybe a free “dress down” or “jeans day,” a moment of serenity, or personalized certificates of participation. Celebrate their risk taking and participation in growing and developing as a professional. Our teachers benefit from the encouragement, incentive and support just as much as our students!



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We look forward to hearing and seeing the ideas and results of your participation in the #LeadLAP challenge! Mandy would love to help! She would love to share ideas, examples or templates of what she has used.  You can email her or connect with her on twitter  or @mandyeellis

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#LeadLAP Challenge – T is for Transformation… Up your PD Game!

You will find the full post of this week’s challenge on Beth’s website here: T is for Transformation.  Click on the link for the full challenge and the great story of how Beth transformed one of her staff meetings.  The gist of the challenge is below…

For this week’s #LeadLAP challenge, think about a meeting, professional development day, inservice, etc. that you have coming up in the next week or two. Ask those transformational questions of yourself as you begin to plan:

  • If your attendees didn’t have to be there, would the room be empty?
  • How could you make this a experience that you could sell tickets to?
  • How could you alter the room or setting to make the learning more meaningful?
  • When planning the content, how could you make it relevant to all that are in attendance?
  • How could voice and choice of participants be honored?
  • Which #tlap hook could you use to increase learning?
  • If you were a participant in the training yourself, would you want to be there?
  • How could you get prior feedback from the participants to help with your planning to personalize and differentiate the experience as much as possible?
  • How could you ensure that the transformation would only add to the learning and not take away?

We hope you’ll join us!!

Shelley and Beth


#LeadLAP Challenge: L is for Learner

change learnerDuring my time as a principal coach, I’ve often worked with people to help them overcome what can only be described as a “fear of having to be the expert”.  Something happens to our brains when we step into administrator roles that seems to make us think we can no longer let people see that there are actually things we still have to learn about teaching and learning.  I’ll be the first one to say that when you decide to step into an educational leadership role, you should know a lot about curriculum, instruction, assessment, sound pedagogy and effective practice – your competence in these areas (along with your character) are a big part of what will start earning you trust.  There is no way you know all there is to know, and that’s ok!  What’s awesome is that you are surrounded by a team of professional educators who can help you fill in your own learning gaps and contribute to your own professional growth on a daily basis… How cool is that?  But for whatever reason, when we walk into classrooms and then later engage in coaching conversations, we feel we have to wear the hat of “expert”.  We observe the lesson and decide what we think worked well and what didn’t and we package it up into feedback that we hope will “fix” the teacher, then we assure them that our conversations and feedback aren’t evaluative and then we ultimately we scratch our heads and wonder why they don’t find our feedback all that valuable and why they get a bit stressed when we walk into their classrooms.

One of the biggest challenges people have with leading ANCHOR conversations is the “Collaborative Conversations” piece, and I think it has a lot to do with them maintaining the “boss” or “expert” role during the conversation.  The administrator does most of the talking or telling and the teacher listens politely (most of the time), says “Thank you” and happily exits the conversation.  A truly collaborative conversation is one where there is no perception or belief by either party that there is an imbalance of power in the conversation.  You both believe that what you say carries equal weight. In other other words… the administrator’s ideas don’t automatically trump the teacher’s just because they carry the title of “boss”.  As leaders… one of the things we need to work hard to do is shake this perception that comes with the title – at least we do if we want to be invited into the real conversations that are happening on our campuses about teaching and learning.

One way to begin to shake this perception is to take every opportunity to show your team that you are a learner too… that you appreciate feedback and learning from them just as much as you enjoy helping them learn and grow.  So, this week’s challenge is all about showing your team that you are a learner (and it will get you into classrooms, too!)

Take at least two hours this week in any configuration that makes sense on your calendar to visit classrooms (but get it on your calendar now or the time will slip away from you).  Try to visit at least 15 classrooms. While you are there, erase any thoughts of things you see and want to fix and instead focus on what YOU are learning from THEM and then tell them.  One of the most amazing opportunities I have had as an administrator is to observe thousands of lessons, and I have learned a TON from what I have seen other teachers do, and I’m certain you have too.  We just have to be open to it and then be willing to share our learning with them.  One of my favorite things to do is to get an opportunity to sit down with a teacher and say to them… “That strategy… method… tech tool… app… content… is new to me.  I learned a ton just by watching you for five minutes. I want to know more – can you teach me?”  Putting ourselves out there as learners, too goes a long way in building the trust and rapport with our colleagues that we need if we want them to find value in the coaching and feedback we provide to them.

So… get into those classrooms this week and drop ANCHORS of LEARNING!

  1.  Set aside two hours to visit classrooms – visit at least 15 over the course of the week
  2. Focus on what you are learning from the teacher during the observation
  3. Drop an ANCHOR of LEARNING… tell the teachers what YOU learned from THEM
  4. Be sure to share how it goes using the #LeadLAP challenge all week

Shelley and Beth